Ultimate Emerald Cut (100 Carat / D / IF) to be Sold by Sotheby’s

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It’s hard to argue when Sotheby calls it Ultimate Emerald Cut Diamond with size of 100.2 ct. color D and internally flawless. Sotheby will auction Ultimate Emerald Cut on April 21st at Magnificent Jewels Sale in New York City; not very often we see a diamond of this size being auctioned.

Described as 'whiter than white' and the 'definition of perfection'

Described as ‘whiter than white’ and the ‘definition of perfection’

Gary Schuler, head of the Sotheby’s jewelry department in New York said in a statement “The color is whiter than white, it is free of any internal imperfections, and so transparent that I can only compare it to a pool of icy water”. He describes this 100.2 ct. diamond as “the definition of perfection”

Lisa Hubbard, chairman of North & South America for Sotheby’s International Jewelry Division, said in a statement “It has everything you could ever want from a diamond. The classic shape begs to be worn, while the quality puts it in an asset class of its own”.

Mined in South Africa and weighed more than 200 carats in the rough

Mined in South Africa and weighed more than 200 carats in the rough

Originally mined by DeBeers in Southern Africa, when found it weighed more than 200 ct. in the rough. It took over one year for current owner to study, cut and polish it. Less than one percent of the world’s diamonds are Type IIa, and they are the most valuable of all diamonds.

 

Ultimate Emerald Cut is expected to fetch between $19 million and $25 million. The diamond will be exhibited in Dubai, Los Angeles, Hong Kong, London and Doha, before returning to New York for exhibition in April.

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118-mn-yr-old dinosaur tracks found in African diamond mine

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Researchers have found nearly 70 tracts of 118 million year old dinosaur, crocodile and large mammal in the Catoca mine in Angola. It also show a mysterious raccoon-sized animal, during a time when most were no larger than a rat. They also found 18 sauropod tracks, with a preserved skin impression.

All the tracks were found in a small sedimentary basin, formed about 118 million years ago, during the Early Cretaceous, in the crater of a kimberlite pipe, researchers said.

Footprints

“These tracks are unique because they are the first vertebrate fossils ever found from the inlands of Angola,” said researcher Marco Marzola of the PaleoAngola Project. “All the other vertebrate fossils on Angola were found on the coastline.”

The Catoca Diamond Mine, the world’s fourth largest diamond mine, had stopped mining for almost eight months to preserve the findings and make the study possible.

The tracks are sent to the Universidade Nova de Lisboa and Southern Methodist University in Dallas, Texas, for preservation and study. Soon they will return to Angola. “Everything belongs to that nation and its heritage,” Marzola said. “This is very important to underline.”